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“There is no reality except the one contained within us. That is why so many people live such an unreal life. They take the images outside them for reality and never allow the world within to assert itself.”
Hermann Hesse, Demian.

Andrei Tarkovsky’s Nostalghia (1983) If you want the world to go forward, we must hold hands. We must mix the so-called healthy with the so-called sick. You healthy ones! What does your health mean? The eyes of all mankind are looking at the pit into which we are plunging. Freedom is useless if you don’t have the courage to look us in the eye, to eat, drink, and sleep with us. It’s the so-called healthy who have brought the world to the verge of ruin. Man, listen! In you, water, fire, and then ashes. We’re not crazy we’re serious. And the bones in the ashes. The bones and the ashes.
Where am I when I’m not in reality or in my imagination? Here’s my new pact with the world: it must be sunny at night and snowy in August. Great things end, small things endure. Society must become united again, instead of so disjointed. Just look at nature and you’ll see that life is simple. We must go back to where we were to the point where you took the wrong turn. We must go back to the main foundations of life without dirtying the water. What kind of world is this, if a madman tells you you must be ashamed of yourselves? Music now.

Ivan’s Childhood (dir. Andrei Tarkovsky,1962)

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The Mirror (dir. Andrei Tarkovsky, 1975) “I had the greatest difficulty in explaining to people that there is no hidden, coded meaning in the film, nothing beyond the desire to tell the truth. Often my assurances provoked incredulity and even disappointment. Some people evidently wanted more: they needed arcane symbols, secret meanings. They were not accustomed to the poetics of the cinema image. And I was disappointed in my turn. Such was the reaction of the opposition party in the audience; as for my own colleagues, they launched a bitter attack on me, accusing me of immodesty, of wanting to make a film about myself.
In the end we were saved by one thing only—faith: the belief that since our work was so important to us it could not but become equally important to the audience. The film aimed at reconstructing the lives of people whom I loved dearly and knew well. I wanted totell the story of the pain suffered by one man because he feels he cannot repay his family for all they have given him. He feels he hasn’t loved them enough, and this idea torments him and will not let him be.
Once you start to speak of things that are precious, you are immediately anxious about how people will react to what you have said, and you want to protect these things, to defend them against incomprehension. We were worried about how future audiences would receive the picture, but at the same time we went on believing, with maniac obstinacy, that we would be heard.”

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The Mirror (dir. Andrei Tarkovsky, 1975)

(via whereidisthereshallegobe)

The Mirror (dir. Andrei Tarkovsky, 1975)

(via whereidisthereshallegobe)

The Mirror (dir. Andrei Tarkovsky, 1975) “A woman wrote from Gorky: ‘Thank you for Mirror. My 
childhood was like that… . Only how did you know about it? 
‘There was that wind, and the thunderstorm … “Galka, put the 
cat out,” cried my Grandmother. .. . It was dark in the room … 
And the paraffin lamp went out, too, and the feeling of waiting for 
my mother to come back filled my entire soul … And how 
beautifully your film shows the awakening of a child’s consciousness, of this thought! … And Lord, how true … we really don’t 
know our mothers’ faces. And how simple … You know, in that 
dark cinema, looking at a piece of canvas lit up by your talent, I felt 
for the first time in my life that I was not alone …’” Sculpting in Time.

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“What is art? A declaration of love: the consciousness of our dependence on each other. A confession. An unconscious act that nonetheless reflects the true meaning of life—love and sacrifice.”
Andrei Tarkovsky

“What is art? A declaration of love: the consciousness of our dependence on each other. A confession. An unconscious act that nonetheless reflects the true meaning of life—love and sacrifice.”
Andrei Tarkovsky

Andrei Rublev (Andrei Tarkovsky, 1966)

The Sacrifice 1986 (Offret) dir. Andrei Tarkovsky
This film is dedicated to my son Andriosha,with hope and confidence.